Tag Archive: Poetry


Hi Everyone. The long hiatus in August and September was caused by sickness in the family and University work. But now I´m back!

First, here´s the long awaited discussion video I did with Missmagic girl!:

I have also began working for the webb-based only swedish feminist magazine “Femt!den”. Below you will find the two articles I´ve written so far:

My take on the poet Warsan Shire, who worked with Beyouncé on “Lemonade”: http://www.femtiden.se/kreativt/poesi-som-visar-det-manskliga-sidan-i-krig-och-flykt/

A deep look at Nellie Wongs poetry: http://www.femtiden.se/kreativt/nellie-wongs-banbrytande-poesi-skildrar-varlden/

Ms. Wong is perhaps the greatest poet that gets criminally little attention. If you like heartbreaking, political and smart poetry, check her out.

Best Wishes/ Maaretta

Langston Hughes (b. 1902-1967) is one of those writers that don’t need an introduction. Mr. Hughes was the author of several plays, dozens of poems, two biographies as well as a slew of other writing projects. Rarely has there been a writer who could deliver such strong wisdom, wit and a sense for justice in his prose. His short stories and poems speak of the nuances and horrors of racial hatred and discrimination. Hughes’ description of a sole black student in the poem “Theme For English B” captures the alienation that’s been magnified by race, and his poem “Madam and her Madam” (where a hard working black maid calls out the white woman she works for after the latter claims there is no barriers between them) speaks of the utter obviousness and destructive naivety whites embodies in a white privileged society. Langston Hughes work spoke of hope and tried to often empower the oppressed in his poems, such as in his poem “Democracy”. In his most famous short story collection, “The Ways of White Folks”, Hughes tells stories of segregation from the point of view of both whites and blacks, the ongoing theme as the title suggest being the ways whites oppress in era of Jim Crow.

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes

One of his most powerful short prose pieces is “Poor Little Black Fellow”, which tells the story of Arnold who at a young age becomes an orphan and is adopted by a white rich couple. Arnolds is black and his lost parents were servants. Arnold, or Arnie as everyone calls him, grows up realizing he is not allowed to do nearly anything. Throughout his childhood and youth Arnie experiences being denied the same rights as the white children. He doesn’t get to join the scouts; he doesn’t get to play with the other children and is not invited to any parties. The Church, which his adoptive parents attend, use him as a symbol of “Christian charity”. Everyone in the story displays a superficial tone of exaggerated niceness to Arnie since they know he can’t be a part of anything. Their kindness is patronizing, not really helping with Arnie´s problems as a toxic bearer of blackness in a world of hidden white oppressions. Indeed, Mr. Hughes shows in this story that kindness can in times be worse than maliciousness. By being nice, the whites are able to deny Arnie any forms of equality or rights. Arnie knows in a way that the kindness is fake, a way to rationalize the racism he faces, but is powerless to say anything. Being extra nice to Arnie does nothing but put Arnie down, since he is not treated as a normal kid. Even worse he is used by his adoptive white parents and their friends and neighbors to make them feel better about themselves, while contributing and continuing the dehumanizing segregation and its hidden ideology.

"Painting Of Black Child" by Maria Saldarriaga, painted on porcelain

“Painting Of Black Child” by Maria Saldarriaga, painted on porcelain

But once Arnie starts to reach adulthood, Arnie and his adoptive parents take a trip to France. There Arnie starts to become immersed in political activism and social milieu (notably “party’s”). He begins a journey where meeting people for the first time gives him the feeling that the kindness he receives isn’t patronizing and degrading, but actually based on him as a person. He even falls in love with a white French girl and plans to marry her.

"Slow Dance", by Brandy Kayzakian-Rowe

“Slow Dance”, by Brandy Kayzakian-Rowe

He wants to stay in France, where he is treated equally and not shut down by faux-kindness. However, when he tells his parents about this plan, the white rich couple for the first time quit being “extra nice” and show their true colors to Arnie.

"Langston Hughes", a painting from the Brooklyn Art Project

“Langston Hughes”, a painting from the Brooklyn Art Project

Hughes uses France as a strong contrast to the US; while one country features segregation, the other provides hope and rights. Many black intellectuals in fact did move to France before and after the civil rights movement, such as James Baldwin and Richard Wright. While France did offer more rights to people of color at the time, the French did their share of also the separation and exotic-fication of blacks in their society.

Ways_of_white_folks_cover

The black French writer Frantz Fanon spoke of how, in his opinion, the French didn’t fully allow for blacks to be black in their own way nor did they fully understand what it was like to be “imprisoned in ones skin color”. Indeed, the French had a subtle, but emphatically problematic way of viewing Africa and Africans, believing them to be the “pure emotional ones”. Blacks were categorized at times as all African and there were cases where whites would tell blacks to behave “more African”. Mr. Fanon wrote an entire book on the account of racism in France, most notable the book “Black skin, White Mask”, where he deals with the psychological aspects in racism. Also, the time Hughes is describing in his story is the same time when Algeria was still colonized by France. So while the basic truth Hughes describes in his story ( that France offered some basic rights for the black Americans while the US still lived in the mind set of Jim Crow) this does erase certain more troublesome aspects of the French racial mindset from that time as well. None the less, Mr. Hughes uses this contrast between the two countries (France is more of metaphorical country in Hughes story than the real France detailed by Mr. Fanon) in a clever way to also show the difference between patronizing and humanizing.

Frantz Fanon

Frantz Fanon

“Poor Little Black Fellow” is a great literary document of the 1930’s. It is also a great example of how racism is more and more insidious than the explicit and obvious malicious and cruel actions engendered in the prejudiced social world. It’s also denial, which Arnie´s adoptive parents are guilty of. Prejudice and hatred take different shapes. Just because one is acting nice it most certainly doesn’t mean the actions are not harmful. This niceness, as described by Mr. Hughes, can be a way to exercise ones privilege and of looking down. Making someone less of a person is exposed in a grammar of oppression regardless of ones tone or being “polite” about it. This story is the perfect example of this, and should therefore be read by everybody who thinks everything will be okay if we are just nice to each other. If only it was so easy, but true kindness comes in the form of true equal rights, opportunity and freedom, as Langston Hughes illustrates.

First, some two to three weeks old, but still worth a read, essays and articles:

At Feministing, Chloe Angyal pondered if Facebook is enabling eating disorders.

At the same blog, you can read about Guatemala launching a femicide unit.

The blog Racialicious had a good article on racist fans of “The Hunger Games” series.

Also at Racialicious, Andrea Plaid made a tribute to Nichelle Nichols, who’s most famous for portraying Uhura in the original “Star Trek”- series.

Feminist Blogger Kelsey Wallace wrote a short, but spot-on and brilliant, critique of George Clooney’s film “The Ides Of March”. Like Ms. Wallace, I was also highly disturb by the films nearly anti-abortion message, as well as the way the female main lead was written as well.

Alya Dawn Johnson at The Angry Black Woman talked about the Bechdel Test and race.

At Bitch Media, Caroline Narby wrote an article on girls and Asperger’s.

At Colorlines, Hatty Lee posted some statistics which show that thousands of young black men die in gun crimes every year.

Since March is ending, which means the end of “Women’s History Month” is near, the team at Gender Across Borders recommends us to remember Marie Curie.

Second, the new:

Glenn Greenwald wrote about three congressional challengers worth supporting.

Blogger Arturo R. Garcia, who’s works focus often on race and popular culture, explored how Felicia Day and Chris Hardwick reinforced Geekdom’s whiteness.

Rest In Peace, Adrienne Rich.

Update: As Maya Dusenbery (feminist blogger and activist) noted perfectly, a win for abortion rights has been made in Argentina! (Article written by Edurne Cárdenas)

And lastly, something fun!

The Lonely Island’s songs haven’t often thrilled me much. However, “Like A Boss” is a hilarious song. Watch the video below!

The Welsh artists “Marina And The Diamonds” song “Oh No!” is witty and colorful social commentary, with a great melody. View the video below!

Here is a well done comical demonstration of a student explaining his poem to his headmaster.

Sorry for the short entry. In a couple of days I’ll post a longer entry!

Today is the international childrens day! For this special day, I will post a touching, yet tragic poem by the Nobel laureate Gabriela Mistral.  Mistral was from Chile, a known feminist and wrote poems centering themes as mother’s love, sorrow, sterility and recovery.

“Tiny Feet”, the poem below, speaks of a child stricken with poverty. Mistral speaks of the poor child’s bravery and of the horror of the adult world ignoring the unfortunate little one. Considering the amount of children still living, around the world, in poverty, this poem is still terrible and horrible accurate.

Tiny Feet
By: Gabriela Mistral

A child’s tiny feet,
Blue, blue with cold,
How can they see and not protect you?
Oh, my God!

Tiny wounded feet,
Bruised all over by pebbles,
Abused by snow and soil!

Man, being blind, ignores
that where you step, you leave
A blossom of bright light,
that where you have placed
your bleeding little soles
a redolent tuberose grows.

Since, however, you walk
through the streets so straight,
you are courageous, without fault.

Child’s tiny feet,
Two suffering little gems,
How can the people pass, unseeing.

Good will to all children! / Maaretta

This Poem written by the Harlem Renaissance author Langston Hughes speaks of the necessity to fight the oppressors and oppression. I’m publishing the piece here to show my support for the (hopefully) democratic uprisings which are currently taking place in Arabic countries:

Democracy

Democracy will not come
Today, this year
Nor ever
Through compromise and fear.

I have as much right
As the other fellow has
To stand
On my two feet
And own the land.

I tire so of hearing people say,
Let things take their course.
Tomorrow is another day.
I do not need my freedom when I’m dead.
I cannot live on tomorrow’s bread.

Freedom
Is a strong seed
Planted
In a great need.

I live here, too.
I want freedom
Just as you.

Gripping poem which explores the effect that bad childhood experiences have on us as adults. A sharp critic of how men treat women and how this treatment teaches women to be cold towards men too.
What about you guys, did you like this poem? disliked it? Loved it? Hated it?
Do you agree with me about what the poem is about? What do you guys think Autumn is trying to say?
Any thoughts on this poem in general?
Love to hear what you guys think!

Best wishes, Maaretta.

Ängel

Hej har kommit hem

Säkert så sov gott min svart

Klädda söt ängel

Artighet

Ditt namn sägs och skrivs

alltid rätt när mitt glöms bort.

Det är ju artigt!

Cyckel
Inte att jag vill

såra dig buss men cyckeln

kan man lite på

Present

Hon godtar bara

massager som gåvor så

från mig får hon noll

Gosse djuren

Sover med katten

du gav i hopp av att

du blir snart mer frisk

Mitt finska accent

Dom gillar inte

mitt finska accent så jag

svär tyst till mig själv

Hjälpa

Jag vill hjälpa att

Plocka bär men jag ser inte

Genom tårarna

Din kille

Vi skulle vara

vänner men din kille vill

jämnt skrämma oss

Everything

 

”Everything is good

and will continue to be

so” The teacher lied.

 

Silly

This is not silly

just evil regardless of what

our dear teacher says!

The Reaffirmation

 He insisted that

he was human even if

nobody else was

 

Att spy

Igår spydde jag

i kyrkan när jag hade

smakat på vinet.

Dröm

Fast vi ses jämnt i

Skolan så får jag inte

Fast dig i min dröm

 

Djävulen

 “Tänk hur mycket vi

Människor gör reklam för

Djävulen” sa far

 

The Contract

Please sign this contract!

It’s for keeping our culture

faraway from ours!

Rosor

Dina ögon är

röda som rosor och ditt

Hjärna har feber.